FEBRUARY 2020: A FUN-DA-MENTALS CLASS

SALTED CHAMOMILE HONEY BEIGNET BITES + RASPBERRY RIPPLE DRIZZLE + RASPBERRY CHAMOMILE FIZZ

What do you call raspberries playing the guitar? A JAM session

What do you call a sad raspberry? A BLUEberry

What do you call a raspberry who got stepped on? TOE JAM

Beignets are to New Orleans as Croissants are to France. You can’t really visit either place without trying their signature desserts. While these beignets are by no means authentic, they are seriously delicious and interesting with the combination of chamomile and raspberry. Classic beignets (pronounced Ben-YAY) are plain and simple, yet still technical, and made with a signature French “CHOUX” dough. Choux (pronounced SHOO) dough is made of butter, water, flour and eggs and is typically without a rising agent like yeast. Instead, the steam created from the wet dough is what causes the dough to rise. Pastries that use this type of dough are typically deep fried, and the high temperatures of the frying oil create steam that makes the dough rise.

In the interest of time and children attention spans, we’re going to use baking soda and baking powder to help our beignets rise and muffin tins. When we tested this recipe, we added tiny bit of water (like ½ tsp) to each muffin tin well to create steam while the beignets were baking - and it worked! You can try this if you want, too, at home.

New Orleans is a place that BUZZES with culture, music, and life, and local people are crazy about their food. Though beignets were originally French, it’s safe to say that New Orleans is the place that made them famous. This is thanks to French settlers who introduced the pastry to Louisiana in the 18th century.

Have fun exploring New Orleans and raspberry fun facts this week and trying new flavor pairings, like raspberry and chamomile, with your family at home.

HAPPY + HEALTHY COOKING - Chef Erin and Chef Jacqui

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