Kid-friendly Chai Tea Glaze Recipe - Sticky Fingers Cooking
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Recipe: Chai Tea Glaze

Recipe: Chai Tea Glaze

Chai Tea Glaze

by Erin Fletter
Photo by Sunny Forest/Shutterstock.com
prep time
5 minutes
cook time
makes
4-6 servings

Fun-Da-Mentals Kitchen Skills

  • measure :

    to calculate the specific amount of an ingredient required using a measuring tool (like measuring cups or spoons).

  • snip :

    to use scissors to cut something with quick, sharp strokes.

  • squeeze :

    to firmly press or twist a food with fingers, hands, or a device to remove its liquid, like shredded potatoes, frozen and thawed spinach, or tofu.

Equipment Checklist

  • Ziplock bag
  • Dry measuring cups
  • Measuring spoons
  • Kid or kitchen scissors
scale
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Ingredients

Chai Tea Glaze

  • 1 C powdered sugar
  • 1 to 2 T brewed decaf chai tea

Instructions

Chai Tea Glaze

1.
measure + smoosh

Kids get to measure 1 cup powdered sugar and 1 to 2 tablespoons of brewed decaf chai tea into a ziplock bag and smoosh all around until a glaze forms.

2.
snip + squeeze

Next, snip the corner of the bag and squeeze the glaze onto cupcakes, like Outrageous Orange Cardamom Chai Cupcakes (see recipe).

Surprise Ingredient: Tea!

back to recipe
Photo by Sun Shock/Shutterstock.com

Hi, I'm Tea!

"I'm a drink made from plant parts, like leaves and flowers. I like to think I'm sweet enough, but some tea drinkers like to add honey or sugar to me, and some add milk to black tea to cool it down. You can drink tea hot or iced!"

History

  • The history of tea began in China as far back as 5,000 years ago. 
  • An old Chinese legend says a man was out walking one day when he accidentally tasted the juices from a tea plant leaf. He thought it tasted great and felt the tea had unique medicinal properties.
  • Another legend suggests it was a mythical emperor called Shennong who discovered tea when a tea blossom fell into a cup of hot water he was drinking.
  • At that time, tea was drunk fresh with the new leaves being mixed with hot water. In those days, the tea leaves were not allowed to oxidize (to combine with oxygen, causing darker leaves), so the leaves remained green. It was only later that oolong and black or red teas were developed. Black tea is fully oxidized, and oolong is semi-oxidized. 
  • Tea drinking grew in popularity and became a pastime for the rich. Fine teas were only available to those who could afford them, and green teas were even used as currency. 
  • Elaborate tea ceremonies developed involving large sets of tea-making equipment. Tea houses sprung up, and tea connoisseurs prided themselves on the quality of their leaves and their tea-making skills.
  • In the 1600s, merchants brought tea to Europe and the United States. Since then, tea drinking has blossomed. 
  • Tea is the most-consumed beverage on the planet, other than water. It is even more popular than coffee and cola! 
  • China is the largest producer of tea, followed by India and Kenya. 

Anatomy & Etymology

  • Tea comes from the cured or fresh leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant, an evergreen growing mainly in warmer and humid climates. 
  • Although the plants can grow up to 52 feet, they are usually kept no higher than waist level to make picking the tender leaves at the top easier.
  • Tea should be kept dry and stored in an airtight container, away from light and heat if possible. Black teas last longer than green teas. Teas made from flowers have an even shorter shelf life. 
  • The word "tea" comes from the mid-17th century Malay "teh" or the Chinese (Min) "te." 

How to Buy & Use

  • Tea can be purchased in various forms. Tea bags are often used today; however, you can still buy loose tea. Cans and bottles of brewed tea, sweetened or unsweetened, are also available, with fruit flavors sometimes added to the tea. 
  • Crushed tea leaves and brewed tea can be used in savory and sweet recipes. 
  • Herbal teas are made from the various parts of edible plants, including fresh or dried flowers, fruit, roots, or seeds.  

Nutrition

  • Teas from the Camellia sinensis plant (white, green, oolong, and black) have high levels of antioxidants which help prevent cancer. Flavonoids in tea help heart health by lowering blood pressure and cholesterol. Another health benefit of tea is improving gut health by promoting good bacteria and inhibiting harmful bacteria. 
  • Teas from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant contain varying amounts of caffeine. Black tea has the most, followed by oolong, green, and white.  
  • Most herbal teas do not contain caffeine; however, they are not necessarily more healthy than black tea. Always check for plant allergies and herb and drug interactions before ingesting herbal teas.

History and Use of Glazes in Baking and Cooking!

Photo by asife/Shutterstock.com
  • A dessert glaze is a liquid, like milk or beaten egg, that gives baked foods a smooth and shiny finish.
  • Glazes used in baking may have originated in medieval Britain, and an Elizabethan glaze has been mentioned in records of that time. It was made of lightly beaten egg white and sugar used on pastries.
  • A simple doughnut glaze is usually made of water or milk and powdered sugar. For a cinnamon roll glaze, use powdered sugar, milk, butter, and vanilla. A glaze for a fruit pie or tart is typically glassine, meaning it is glossy and transparent, and jams or jellies that complement the fruit are used to accomplish that.
  • Some cakes are covered with a "mirror" glaze, which may be made of unflavored gelatin, water, granulated sugar, sweetened condensed milk or cream, fruit purée or chocolate (milk, dark, or white), and food coloring.
  • Glazes used in cooking include demi-glace (half-glaze), which originated in France, a rich, glossy brown sauce served with meat. It is made with beef stock which has been reduced (partly evaporated) to which wine is added.
  • Another example of a savory glaze is the type used on ham. Ham glazes are made with a sweet component for caramelization, like brown sugar, honey, or maple syrup. They also include a tangy element such as mustard, vinegar, orange juice, or pineapple juice. Finally, various spices are added, like cinnamon, cloves, garlic, ginger, and rosemary.

Let's Learn About India!

Photo by Charu Chaturvedi on Unsplash
  • India is a country in South Asia and is officially called the Republic of India. It is the second-most populous country in the world and has the largest population of any democratic nation. 
  • Hindi and English are official languages, and there are 447 native languages spoken in India.
  • India's government includes a president, prime minister, and parliament. Twenty-eight states and eight union territories make up India's federal union. 
  • India's currency is the Indian "rupee." It is illegal for foreigners to take rupees out of India.
  • Emperor Shah Jahan commissioned the Taj Mahal's construction in 1632 for his wife, Mumtaz Mahal.
  • The anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi's birthday is celebrated on October 2. He is considered India's "Father of the Nation" and led the Indian people to independence from 89 years of British rule in 1947. Gandhi's peaceful protest movement inspired many people in other countries.
  • India's national symbols are the lotus flower, the Bengal tiger, and the peacock.
  • Some of the world's highest mountains are in India, including Kanchenjunga, the third tallest at 28,169 feet. 
  • The Bay of Bengal is a huge bay bordering the southeastern part of India and is home to the world's largest mangrove forest. Here, tigers swim in the same waters as dolphins, sea turtles, sharks, and saltwater crocodiles. 
  • The snow leopard, the Indian rhinoceros, the Bengal tiger, and the Asian elephant are all animals of India. Globally, it is the only country that has both lions and tigers.
  • The most popular sport in India is cricket!
  • It is hot in India, so people there often wear loose clothes. Traditional clothing differs by area in India. Women may wear saris, long pieces of colorful cotton or silk draped over and around the body like a dress. Men may wear a dhoti, made of material wrapped around the hips and pulled through the legs, somewhat resembling loose pants, although they aren't seen in cities much anymore. Photos of Gandhi show him wearing dhotis.
  • Seventy percent of the world's spices come from India.
  • Staple foods in India include lentils, rice, bread, and spices. People living on the coast eat more fish and seafood. In other regions, they eat chicken, beef, and game meats. Many people throughout India are vegetarians. Common fruits and vegetables are mangoes, apples, oranges, pineapples, bananas, onions, okra, potatoes, spinach, and carrots.  
  • Curries are popular dishes in India and are made with a variety of vegetables, fish, meat, and fruits, and spices. 
  • When people greet each other in India, as a sign of respect, they bow, placing their hands together before their chest or face, and say "Namaste," which translates to "I bow to the divine in you."

What's It Like to Be a Kid in India?

  • Indian parents are encouraged to start their kids in preschool at 2½ to 3 years old. School is usually taught in a particular state's language, which could be Hindi, English, or another language. 
  • Kids often have their grandparents living with them in the family household.
  • Along with cricket, tennis, badminton, and chess, kids may play traditional Indian games like kabaddi or kho-kho, both played by teams, or kancha, a marble game played individually or with others.
  • Kids enjoy the Holi festival, which is a religious celebration that also heralds the arrival of spring. Celebrated in various ways throughout the country, most versions include the joyous spraying and throwing of colorful powders by festival participants at one another. 

Lettuce Joke Around

"Knock, knock!"

"Who’s there?"

"Chai."

"Chai who?" 

"Don’t be Chai (shy). Open the door and have some tea with me!"

The Yolk's On You

The chai is grumbling about how long the kettle takes to boil.

It finds the waiting very tea-dious.

Lettuce Joke Around

If at first you don’t like tea...

...chai, chai again.

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