Kid-friendly "Guggy Eggs" Omelettes Recipe - Sticky Fingers Cooking
over 1,000 kid-approved recipes coming soon! save your flavorites
Recipes
/
Recipe: "Guggy Eggs" Omelettes

Recipe: "Guggy Eggs" Omelettes

"Guggy Eggs" Omelettes

by Dylan Sabuco
Photo by Merrimon Crawford/Shutterstock.com
prep time
5 minutes
cook time
15 minutes
makes
4-6 servings

Fun Food Story

Skip to recipe

"Guggy Eggs" Omelettes

Irish kids sometimes call eggs "gugs" (rhymes with "bugs!") which is where the word "guggy" comes from in this recipe. But don't let the silly name fool you—these eggs are packed with flavor and are sure to become a new breakfast favorite! Traditionally, "guggy" eggs are made in a cup, but we'll make ours in a muffin pan. (Now, that's egg-citing!)

Happy & Healthy Cooking,

Chef Erin, Food-Geek-in-Chief

Fun-Da-Mentals Kitchen Skills

  • bake :

    to cook food with dry heat, as in an oven.

  • crack :

    to break open or apart a food to get what's inside, like an egg or a coconut.

  • measure :

    to calculate the specific amount of an ingredient required using a measuring tool (like measuring cups or spoons).

  • whisk :

    to beat or stir ingredients vigorously with a fork or whisk to mix, blend, or incorporate air.

Equipment Checklist

  • Oven
  • Muffin pan
  • Large mixing bowl
  • Liquid measuring cup
  • Measuring spoons
  • Cutting board + kid-safe knife
  • Whisk
scale
1X
2X
3X
4X
5X
6X
7X

Ingredients

"Guggy Eggs" Omelettes

  • 5 eggs **(for EGG ALLERGY sub 15 T (about 1 C) refrigerated egg substitute, like Just Egg brand OR use Egg-Free "Guggy" Tofu Scramble recipe)**
  • 1/4 C water
  • 1 garlic clove, minced, or 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground mustard
  • 1 T vegetable oil + more for greasing pan
  • 2 green onions

Food Allergen Substitutions

"Guggy Eggs" Omelettes

  • Egg: For 5 eggs in Omelettes, substitute 15 T (about 1 C) refrigerated egg substitute, like Just Egg brand OR instead of the "Guggy Eggs" Omelettes, use the Egg-Free "Guggy" Tofu Scramble recipe.

Instructions

"Guggy Eggs" Omelettes

1.
intro

"Guggy Eggs" are typically made by cooking eggs in a cup until they are soft and still runny on the inside but tender and fluffy on the outside. This recipe will have you create your own "guggy eggs" in the wells of a muffin pan. This fun twist on an Irish egg dish will add another option to your breakfast lineup.

2.
crack + measure

Start off by cracking 5 eggs into a large mixing bowl. Then measure 1/4 cup water, 1 minced garlic clove, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon ground mustard, and 1 tablespoon vegetable oil and add those to the bowl.

3.
chop + whisk

Roughly chop 2 green onions and add those to the egg bowl as well. Now, whisk until all the eggs are smoothly combined. It should be hard to tell the difference between the egg whites and egg yolks.

4.
preheat + bake

Preheat your oven to 350 F. Meanwhile, grease a muffin pan with a tiny amount of vegetable oil or cooking spray. Pour the egg mixture into the wells of the muffin pan until they are each 2/3 full. Place the muffin pan in the oven and bake for 15 minutes or until there are no runny eggs left in the pan.

5.
remove + serve

Remove the guggy eggs from the muffin pan and serve alongside your favorite breakfast staples.

Surprise Ingredient: Eggs!

back to recipe
Photo by Circlephoto/Shutterstock.com

Hi! I'm an Egg!

"Specifically, I'm a chicken egg! Of course, there are eggs from all sorts of other creatures, but humans primarily eat the eggs of fowls, mostly chickens. Although, they will eat the eggs of ducks, geese, and even ostriches (the same as 24 chicken eggs!). Some people also eat reptile eggs and fish eggs (think caviar!)."

History

  • Some animals reproduce by laying eggs (or reproductive cells). These animals include fish, reptiles, insects, a few mammals, like the platypus, and birds, including ducks and chickens. 
  • What came first? The chicken or the egg? Were chickens first domesticated for their meat, or were they raised to gather their eggs for food? When early man first began raising chickens sometime before 7500 BCE, it may have been for their eggs. 
  • Eggs used to be carried in baskets. The first egg carton was invented in 1911 by Joseph Coyle, a newspaper editor from British Columbia, Canada, to solve a dispute involving broken eggs delivered in a basket. His design was improved upon in 1921 by Morris Koppelman, and then in 1931, Francis H Sherman of Massachusetts developed a carton from pressed paper pulp similar to what we use today. Egg cartons can hold 12, 18, or 30 eggs.
  • The white Leghorn chicken is commonly used for laying white eggs, and the Rhode Island Red and New Hampshire Red breeds, both reddish brown, are the primary sources of brown eggs.
  • The brown-colored egg tends to be more expensive than its white counterpart, usually because the hens laying brown eggs are larger and eat more feed, increasing costs to the farm. Other than color, there is no difference between a white and brown egg.

Anatomy 

  • Chicken eggs contain a yellow yolk, semi-transparent white, and an outer protective shell. A membrane (film layer) lines the eggshell; however, it is usually not visible unless you peel a boiled egg.  
  • The egg yolk provides the most nutrients for a developing embryo because it has more protein than the white. The yolk also contains all the fat and more vitamins, especially fat-soluble vitamins.
  • The egg white or albumen is about 90 percent water and contains no fat or cholesterol. It protects the yolk and is also a source of protein and a few vitamins for an embryo.
  • Chicken eggshell membranes can be used as a dietary supplement. The membranes are made up mostly of fibrous collagen type 1 fibers. 
  • According to the USDA, the eggshell comprises about 94 percent calcium carbonate and some additional elements, including protein. The calcium carbonate from eggshells is used as a dietary calcium supplement for people who do not get enough calcium from their food. 
  • There are 7 to 17,000 tiny pores on the shell surface, with a greater number at the large end. As the egg ages, these minute holes permit moisture and carbon dioxide to move out and air to move in to form the air cell. The egg can also absorb refrigerator odors through the pores, so always refrigerate eggs in their cartons.

How to Buy & Eat

  • You can buy eggs from farm stands and at grocery stores. Always open the lid of a carton and check the eggs you want to purchase to avoid buying eggs with cracked or broken eggshells that would have to be thrown away. Any bacteria present on the eggshell could enter through a crack and contaminate the egg inside.
  • Aside from their color, brown and white eggs are the same in every way, including taste and nutrition, so choose eggs based on price and quality, not on color. 
  • The three grades of eggs that determine the quality of the egg and condition of the shell are: Grade AA, A, and B. According to the USDA, Grade AA eggs have thick and firm whites and yolks that are high, round, and practically free from defects, with clean, unbroken shells. Grade AA and A eggs are preferred when frying or poaching. You would seldom find Grade B eggs in stores because they are mostly used to make liquid, frozen, and dried egg products. 
  • Various types of eggs are available at the grocery store, and some are more expensive than others. These include eggs from hens raised outside a cage but not necessarily outdoors (cage-free) or allowed to roam free outdoors in a pasture (pasture-raised). 
  • Eggs contain some omega-3 fatty acids, but eggs labeled as high in omega-3 fatty acids have more due to flaxseed or fish oil being added to the hens' diets. Other eggs are labeled "organic" if the hens are not raised in a cage, can access the outdoors, are fed organic feed, and are not given hormones or antibiotics. "Vegetarian" eggs are from hens that do not eat feed containing animal by-products. 
  • Store eggs in the refrigerator to keep them fresher, as they will age faster at room temperature.
  • Eggs are available year-round to provide delicious meals on their own and as an essential ingredient for the many baked goods and sauces that would never be the same without them.
  • Eggs are enormously versatile. The chef's hat, called a "toque" (pronounced "tōk"), is said to have a pleat for each of the many ways you can cook eggs.
  • You can tell whether an egg is raw or hard-boiled by spinning it. Because the liquids have set into a solid, a hard-boiled egg will easily spin. On the other hand, the moving fluids in a raw egg will cause it to wobble.
  • Whole eggs are eaten soft or hard-boiled, fried, or poached, or they are added to cake and other batters. Egg yolks are used in pasta, sauces, fruit curds, crème brûlée, and ice cream. Egg whites are part of meringues, angel food cakes, French macarons, and coconut macaroons. You can also use whipped egg whites to leaven (raise) a cake.  

Nutrition

  • A large, boiled egg is a good source of low-cost, high-quality protein, providing 12.6 grams with only 78 calories. 
  • Eggs are rich in vitamin B12 and riboflavin (B2) and supply varying amounts of many other nutrients, including a wide variety of other vitamins and minerals. In addition, the yolk contains a higher percentage of an egg's vitamins than the white, including all of the vitamins A, D, E, and K. 
  • Egg yolks are one of the few foods that naturally contain vitamin D. They also have choline. This essential nutrient benefits your brain, nervous system, liver function, and cardiovascular system.
  • Some people have an allergy or food intolerance to eggs, especially egg whites. It is one of the most common allergies in babies but is often outgrown during childhood.

Let's Learn About Ireland!

Photo by Thomas Bresenhuber/Shutterstock.com (Rock of Cashel)
  • Ireland, or the Republic of Ireland, is on the island of Ireland, called Éire in the Irish language. Its nickname is the Emerald Isle because it is very green and lush! 
  • Ireland is a country in northwestern Europe, west of Great Britain, another island.
  • The Republic of Ireland shares a border with Northern Ireland, which belongs to the United Kingdom. England, Scotland, Wales, which make up Great Britain, and Northern Ireland are all part of the UK.
  • Irish is one of two official languages, with English being the second; however, English is more commonly spoken.
  • Over 5 million people live in Ireland, and its total area is 32,595 square miles. Their currency is the euro. 
  • The capital city, Dublin, and its environs are home to about 40 percent of the population of Ireland.
  • Ireland has a long, complicated history, but people called the Celts made their home in the region about 700 years BCE and thrived for almost 2,000 years. Then, in the Middle Ages, Vikings arrived on ships and started settling the area, which led to conflict.
  • The Rock of Cashel is one of several popular tourist sites in Ireland. It is a rocky, limestone outcropping. At the top, you will find medieval buildings, including a Gothic cathedral; a Romanesque chapel called Cormac's Chapel, named for a King of Munster; the Hall of the Vicars Choral; a 15th-century Tower House; an abbey; a round tower; and a high cross. Saint Patrick, of St. Patrick's Day fame, is associated with the Rock of Cashel.
  • Ireland was part of the United Kingdom from 1801 until December 6, 1922, when it became a self-governing nation but still part of the British Empire, known as the Irish Free State. In 1937 it became a republic, which was made official in 1949. The British had been involved in Ireland since 1169, when the Anglo-Normans invaded, and English kings claimed sovereignty there.
  • The Great Famine (or Irish Potato Famine) affected Ireland from 1845 to 1849. Potatoes were a staple food, and when the potato blight decimated the potato crop. As a result, many people got sick, died, or fled the country, and the population decreased by 30 percent.
  • The green on the Irish flag represents Ireland's nationalists, orange represents the Protestant followers of William of Orange in Ireland, and white represents peace between the two groups.
  • Some of the well-known symbols of Ireland include the shamrock, Celtic knot, Celtic cross, and the Celtic harp.
  • Famous Irish authors and poets include Jonathan Swift, Bram Stoker, Oscar Wilde, W. B. Yeats, James Joyce, and George Bernard Shaw.
  • Ireland is also famous for its Irish Celtic music and Irish dancing.
  • Green is associated with St. Patrick's Day because it is the color of spring, Ireland, and the shamrock. Saint Patrick's Day on March 17 is a public religious and cultural holiday in Ireland. Many other countries around the world also celebrate it.
  • St. Patrick's Day was celebrated in the United States for the first time in 1737 in Boston, Massachusetts. However, the city to hold the first official St. Patrick's Day parade was New York City, starting in 1766. Over 100 US cities now have Saint Patrick's Day parades. After all, on St. Patrick's day, "everybody is Irish!"
  • Traditional Irish sports are Gaelic football and hurling, and they are also the most popular sports in the country. Association football (soccer) is third in popularity. Additional sports include rugby, cricket, and horseracing. At the Olympics, boxing is Ireland's most successful sport.
  • Irish cuisine includes "boxty" (potato pancake), "colcannon" (mashed potatoes with cabbage), "coddle" (a dish of potatoes, sausage, thin bacon or "rashers," and onion), and Irish soda bread.  
  • A "full Irish breakfast" consists of bacon, pork sausage, fried eggs, black pudding (blood sausage), baked beans, sliced tomato, sautéed mushrooms, soda bread or toast, and tea or coffee.

What's It Like to Be a Kid in Ireland?

  • If kids in Ireland live in Irish-speaking communities, their schools teach classes in the Irish language. If they live in English-speaking areas, instruction is in the English language, unless kids attend an Irish-language school called a "gaelscoil," where classes are in Irish.
  • Most Irish schools require students to wear uniforms.
  • Irish children may play "rounders," a bat and ball game, "skipping" or jumping rope, marbles, and Irish "skittles," a bowling-like game where kids try to hit pins that are set up on the ground with pieces of wood called skittles.
  • Kids may participate in some of the following sports: Gaelic football, handball, hurling or camogie, association football (soccer), rugby, boxing, and swimming.
  • For breakfast, kids may eat the full, traditional Irish breakfast or have pancakes or scones. For a snack, they may eat potato chips or Irish flapjacks, which are granola bars made with oats. A favorite sweet treat is a fairy cake, a small cupcake with icing drizzled on top

Lettuce Joke Around

What did the chicken say when it laid a square egg? 

"Ouch!"

Lettuce Joke Around

Why shouldn't you tell an Easter egg a good joke?

It might crack up!

Lettuce Joke Around

What did one egg say to the other? 

"Heard any good yolks lately?"

Lettuce Joke Around

What did the egg say to the other egg?

"Let's get cracking!"

The Yolk's On You

What do you call a hen who can count her own eggs?

A mathmachicken! 

Shop Our Cookbooks

Now available on Amazon! Our cookbooks feature kid-tested recipes that build confidence in the kitchen. Expand your child's palate and spark a love of healthy foods with a Sticky Fingers Cooking cookbook.
SHOP NOW

Subscribe to the Sticky Fingers Cooking mailing list

Subscribe to our newsletter, The Turnip, to receive exclusive discounts and updates, insider tips + tricks from our awesome team, and instant access to the Sticky Fingers Cooking Starter Kit for free!

"
X
Simply the zest!
Brittany from Parker just joined a class