Kid-friendly Rainbow “Crudités” Veggie Sticks + Cool Ranch Dip for One Recipe - Sticky Fingers Cooking
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Recipe: Rainbow “Crudités” Veggie Sticks + Cool Ranch Dip for One

Recipe: Rainbow “Crudités” Veggie Sticks + Cool Ranch Dip for One

Rainbow “Crudités” Veggie Sticks + Cool Ranch Dip for One

by Erin Fletter
Photo by Richard M Lee/Shutterstock.com
prep time
10 minutes
cook time
makes
1-2 servings

Fun Food Story

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Rainbow “Crudités” Veggie Sticks + Cool Ranch Dip for One

Each of our SFC Sweet Mug Recipes also include this section of the lesson, where kids snack on raw veggies and dip. All veggies are good for the brain! The purpose is to reinforce and encourage kids to eat veggies and have them learn a little about what each vegetable does for the body! Kids will show which veggie(s) they’ve chosen and share the benefit below. Snack on veggies and encourage kids to eat at least 3 pieces to power up their brains before making the mug cake! Green veggies help keep you from catching a cold! White veggies give you energy! Yellow veggies help make your bones strong! Orange veggies are good for your heart! Blue and Purple veggies are good for your memory! Red veggies are good for your blood!

Happy & Healthy Cooking,

Chef Erin, Food-Geek-in-Chief

Fun-Da-Mentals Kitchen Skills

  • dip :

    to briefly put a solid food, such as chips, fries, battered fried fish, hot sandwich (French dip), or veggie slices, into a liquid, like beef broth or a thicker sauce, like ketchup, dressing, or a dip to impart moisture and extra flavor to the solid food.

  • juice :

    to extract or squeeze out the juice of a fruit or vegetable, like a lemon, orange, or carrot, often cutting open or peeling the fruit or veggie first to access its flesh.

  • measure :

    to calculate the specific amount of an ingredient required using a measuring tool (like measuring cups or spoons).

  • mix :

    to thoroughly combine two or more ingredients until uniform in texture.

  • slice :

    to cut into thin pieces using a sawing motion with your knife.

  • tear :

    to pull or rip apart a food, like basil leaves, into pieces instead of cutting with a knife; cutting breaks cell walls more, so herbs can discolor faster.

Equipment Checklist

  • Soap for cleaning hands
  • Cutting board
  • Kid-safe knife (a butter knife works great)
  • Small bowl
  • Citrus zester or box grater with small zesting holes
  • Citrus juicer (optional, but encouraged)
  • Measuring spoons
scale
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Ingredients

Rainbow “Crudités” Veggie Sticks + Cool Ranch Dip for One

  • Kid chefs' choice for “Crudités:”:
  • 4 to 5 baby carrots or carrot chips
  • 1 to 2 celery stalks
  • 1 mini cucumber or 1/4 large cucumber
  • 3 to 5 cherry tomatoes **(Omit for NIGHTSHADE ALLERGY)**
  • 1 to 2 red radishes
  • 2 to 3 jicama sticks
  • 1/2 red, orange, or yellow bell pepper **(Omit for NIGHTSHADE ALLERGY)**
  • 3 to 5 mini sweet peppers **(Omit for NIGHTSHADE ALLERGY)**
  • Ranch Dip:
  • 1 pinch fresh chopped parsley (or dried parsley/dried dill)
  • 1/2 lemon
  • 2 T full-fat plain Greek yogurt **(for DAIRY ALLERGY sub dairy-free/nut-free plain Greek yogurt)**
  • 1 pinch garlic powder
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 pinch ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp water
  • 1 pinch sugar, optional

Food Allergen Substitutions

Rainbow “Crudités” Veggie Sticks + Cool Ranch Dip for One

  • Nightshade: Omit optional cherry tomatoes, bell peppers, and sweet peppers.
  • Dairy: Substitute dairy-free/nut-free plain Greek yogurt.

Instructions

Rainbow “Crudités” Veggie Sticks + Cool Ranch Dip for One

1.
intro

Each of our SFC Sweet Mug Recipes also include this section of the lesson, where kids snack on raw veggies and dip. All veggies are good for the brain! The purpose is to reinforce and encourage kids to eat veggies and have them learn a little about what each vegetable does for the body! Kids will show which veggie(s) they’ve chosen and share the benefit below. Snack on veggies and encourage kids to eat at least 3 pieces to power up their brains before making the mug cake! Green veggies help keep you from catching a cold! White veggies give you energy! Yellow veggies help make your bones strong! Orange veggies are good for your heart! Blue and Purple veggies are good for your memory! Red veggies are good for your blood!

2.
tear + zest + juice

To make the dip, tear 1 pinch of parsley leaves into tiny bits! Add the parsley to a small bowl. Zest 1 lemon and add a pinch of zest to the parsley. Slice the lemon in half and add a squeeze of juice. Watch for seeds!

3.
measure + mix

Measure and add 2 tablespoons of Greek yogurt, 1 pinch of garlic powder, 1 pinch of salt, 1 pinch of black pepper, and 1 teaspoon of water to the bowl with the parsley and lemon. Use a spoon to mix! Taste! What does it need? Add more lemon, salt, pepper, or garlic powder a little at a time until your dip tastes great to you. Add 1 pinch of sugar to balance flavors if you wish.

4.
slice + dip

Have kid chefs slice up their raw vegetables of choice into sticks or bite-sized pieces, and then dip their Rainbow “Crudités” Veggie Sticks in the Cool Ranch Dip! Delightful!}

Surprise Ingredient: Yogurt!

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Photo by mama_mia/Shutterstock.com

Hi! I'm Yogurt!

"I'm a creamy and tangy food, and I'm very versatile! I work with both savory and sweet dishes. I also have less fat and more protein than sour cream, but you can often cook with me in the same way!"

History & Etymology

  • Yogurt's origin is undetermined. The earliest yogurts may have been spontaneously fermented by bacteria on plants or milk-producing animals. Historians believe it may have emerged during the last Stone Age, sometime between 10,000 to 4,500 BCE, when the Neolithic people began domesticating animals. 
  • Ancient Grecians, Romans, and Persians ate a yogurt-like dairy product called "oxygala" (οξύγαλα). They would eat it with honey. These days people often eat plain yogurt with honey, especially Greek yogurt.  
  • Greek yogurt is strained, which eliminates the whey and other liquids, causing it to be thicker and have more tang than regular yogurt. It also has two times the amount of protein. It is called Greek-style yogurt if it is thickened by adding powdered milk or another dry thickener. People with lactose intolerance may have less trouble eating it.
  • In 1916, Isaac Carasso of Barcelona introduced packaged yogurt to Europe. He dubbed it Danone, his son Daniel's nickname.
  • Yogurt with added fruit jam was introduced in 1933 in Prague. Dannon, the North American subsidiary of Danone, produced a fruit-on-the-bottom yogurt in 1947. 
  • The word "yogurt" is from the early 17th century and is derived from the Turkish "yoğurt" (pronounced "yohght"). 

How Is it Made?

  • Yogurt is a fermented dairy product made with milk. The bacteria used to ferment the milk is called the yogurt culture or starter. During fermentation, the lactose (the sugar in milk) is converted into lactic acid, which gives yogurt its tangy flavor and changes the milk protein, resulting in yogurt's texture. 
  • In various parts of the world, yogurt may be made from cow's milk, the most common source, or the milk of camels, goats, sheep, water buffalo, and yaks. 
  • Soy yogurt, a dairy-free alternative, is made from soy milk, which is not an animal product, as it is made from soybeans. 
  • Milk is first heated to about 185 degrees F to kill undesirable bacteria and alter the milk proteins so that they set together rather than form curds. The milk is then cooled to about 113 degrees F. Next, the bacteria culture or starter is added, and the temperature is kept at 86 to 113 degrees F for 6 to 12 hours to allow fermentation. 
  • If mold develops on the yogurt, toss it, as scraping off the top, visibly moldy layer does not entirely remove mold that has seeped into the rest of the yogurt. 

How to Eat It

  • You can eat plain yogurt by itself or with some honey or fruit. You can also buy yogurt that has already been sweetened and with fruit or fruit jam added. 
  • You can add plain yogurt to salad dressings, dips, sauces, and soups. It can add extra tang and richness to meat and poultry dishes in place of sour cream and brings tang and moisture to pancakes, cakes, and other baked goods. A fun way to eat fruit-flavored yogurt is in pies and frozen yogurt popsicles. 

Nutrition

  • Yogurt is rich in protein, vitamins B12 and riboflavin (B2), and the minerals phosphorus and calcium. 
  • Some studies found that eating 80 grams per day of low-fat yogurt was connected with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes and aiding bone health and digestion.

What are Crudités?

  • Crudités (croo-deh-TAYS) consists of a plate of assorted sliced or whole raw vegetables, served as an appetizer with a vinaigrette or dipping sauce. 
  • The word "crudités" is the plural of the French word "crudité," which means "rawness." In its use as an "hors d'oeuvre" (ohr DURV) or appetizer, "crudités" is always plural. It was first used in English in 1960. 
  • Vegetables may include bell pepper strips, broccoli, carrot sticks, cauliflower, celery sticks, cherry tomatoes, cucumber sticks, and radishes.
  • Dipping sauces typically have sour cream, yogurt, mayonnaise, soft cheese, puréed beans, or a combination. Examples are ranch dressing, blue cheese dressing, green goddess dressing, spinach artichoke dip, or hummus.

Let's Learn About France!

Photo by Alliance Images/Shutterstock.com
  • Bonjour (hello)! Bienvenue en (welcome to) France and the spectacular Eiffel Tower in Paris, the Mona Lisa, painted by Leonardo da Vinci, and ancient Roman ruins in the Provence region.
  • France is a European country, and its official name is the French Republic. The capital city is Paris, which also has the most people. 
  • France's land area is 248,573 square miles. That is almost the size of the US state of Texas! The number of people in France is 67,874,000, about 43 percent more than in Texas.
  • The official and national language is French, which is also the official language in 12 other countries, and a co-official language in 16 countries, including Canada. 
  • France's government consists of a president, a prime minister, and a parliament and is divided into regions and departments rather than states and counties.
  • The French have a well-known motto, "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity."
  • In addition to the Eiffel Tower, France is known for the Louvre, the most visited art museum worldwide (the Mona Lisa resides there), the Notre-Dame Cathedral, and the French Riviera (Côte d'Azur) in southeastern France on the Mediterranean coast.
  • France is famous for the "beaux-arts" (fine arts). Paris is still home to many artists and great painters, artisans, and sculptors. Great literature came from French authors, such as Victor Hugo's novels Les Misérables and The Hunchback of Notre Dame.
  • Paris has two popular nicknames. The most common is "The City of Light" (La Ville Lumière), which came about because Paris was the first European city to implement street lighting in 1860, lighting up the city with 56,000 gas street lamps. The second is "The City of Love," (La Ville de L'amour). This name is probably due to Paris being considered one of the most romantic cities in the world and the high number of marriage proposals at the Eiffel Tower!
  • French cuisine is known for its freshness and high quality. Many of the world's greatest pastries originated in France, such as the croissant, eclair, and macaron!
  • Other French foods are escargot (snails!), baguette (bread), ratatouille (roasted tomato, zucchini, and eggplant—remember the movie?!), and crepes (very thin pancakes).

What's It Like to Be a Kid in France?

  • Most kids start school (preschool) at around age three. Depending on the area and the school, students go to school 4 to 5 days a week. They often get a 1½-hour lunch break, and some kids go home for lunch. 
  • Dinner is served at 7:30 pm or later, so afternoon snacks are essential. "Le goûter" (goo-tay), or afternoon tea, often includes a "tartine," a slice of bread topped with something sweet or savory (like cheese, butter and jam, or Nutella). Other popular snacks are yogurt, fromage blanc (white cheese), and fruit. 
  • Popular sports for kids are soccer, bicycling, and tennis.
  • There are several parks in France, in and around Paris. Napoleon III even designed one of them, the Bois de Boulogne, where you can find beautiful gardens, lakes, a zoo, an amusement park, and two horse racing tracks. In addition, kids can go on pony rides, play mini-golf, and race remote control boats at many public parks.  
  • Of course, kids can also go to the most popular theme park in Europe, Disneyland Paris, which opened in 1992. While there, kids can go on a ride unique to Disneyland Paris: Ratatouille: The Adventure!

Lettuce Joke Around

How did the gardener mend his trousers? 

With a vegetable patch!

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