Kid-friendly Sweetly Whipped Strawberry Cream for One Recipe - Sticky Fingers Cooking
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Recipe: Sweetly Whipped Strawberry Cream for One

Recipe: Sweetly Whipped Strawberry Cream for One

Sweetly Whipped Strawberry Cream for One

by Erin Fletter
Photo by Gorgev/Shutterstock.com
prep time
5 minutes
cook time
makes
1-2 servings

Fun Food Story

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Sweetly Whipped Strawberry Cream for One

In this exciting recipe, you’ll experience the joy of scratch-cooking. From chopping and sprinkling to mixing and shaking, satisfaction awaits at each step. Watch as liquid cream magically transforms into velvety, whipped cream right before your very eyes! And the best part? You get to eat the delicious reward!

Happy & Healthy Cooking,

Chef Erin, Food-Geek-in-Chief

Fun-Da-Mentals Kitchen Skills

  • chop :

    to cut something into small, rough pieces using a blade.

  • knife skills :

    Bear Claw (growl), Pinch, Plank, and Bridge (look out for trolls)

  • seal :

    to close tightly, keeping filling inside.

  • shake :

    to rapidly and vigorously move a covered container filled with food up and down and side to side to combine ingredients and create a different consistency, such as shaking whipped cream to make butter.

  • stir :

    to mix together two or more ingredients with a spoon or spatula, usually in a circle pattern, or figure eight, or in whatever direction you like!

Equipment Checklist

  • Cutting board
  • Kid-safe knife
  • Small mixing bowl
  • Measuring spoons
  • Dry measuring cups
  • Glass or plastic jar + tight-fitting lid
scale
1X
2X
3X
4X
5X
6X
7X

Ingredients

Sweetly Whipped Strawberry Cream for One

  • 2 ripe strawberries
  • 1 big pinch sugar
  • 1/4 C heavy whipping cream **(for DAIRY ALLERGY omit recipe or sub coconut cream)**
  • 1 pinch salt

Food Allergen Substitutions

Sweetly Whipped Strawberry Cream for One

  • Dairy: Substitute coconut cream for heavy whipping cream OR omit recipe and top cake with strawberry and sugar mixture only.

Instructions

Sweetly Whipped Strawberry Cream for One

1.
dice + sprinkle + mix

Dice 2 strawberries into tiny pieces. Add them to a small bowl, sprinkle 1 big pinch of sugar over them, and mix to coat the strawberries in sugar. Set aside.

2.
measure + pour + shake

Measure and pour 1/4 cup of whipping cream into a pint-sized glass or plastic jar and seal with the lid. With one hand over the lid and the other holding the jar, start shaking the jar back and forth, up and down, round and round, and side to side! Your cream will begin to thicken after about 20 to 30 seconds of shaking. Check it! You want your cream to be thick but not as thick as butter.

3.
add + stir + top

Add your chopped strawberries, their juices, and 1 small pinch of salt to the jar. Stir to combine. You can top Strawberry Banana Pudding Mug Cake or another dessert with Sweetly Whipped Strawberry Cream.

Surprise Ingredient: Strawberry!

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Photo by FamVeld/Shutterstock.com

Hi! I’m Strawberry!

"Hello! I want to introduce myself. I'm Strawberry—and I have my very own month—May! I'm great in desserts, breakfast foods, snacks, salads, and fragrances. I like to be a part of picnics and holiday celebrations. So combine me with blueberries and bananas (or whipped cream, vanilla pudding, or white cake) for a red, white, and blue dessert for Independence Day in the United States or Bastille Day in France."

History

  • The garden strawberry as we know it was first bred and cultivated in France in the 1750s. It was a cross between a Virginian strawberry and a Chilean strawberry. 
  • The ancient Romans believed strawberries had medicinal powers. So they used them to treat everything from depression to fainting to fever, kidney stones, bad breath, and sore throats.
  • Native Americans made cornbread with crushed strawberries and cornmeal; this is how strawberries were introduced to Colonists and served as an inspiration for the invention of strawberry shortcake.
  • In some parts of Europe, people once believed elves could control how much milk cows produced and that the elves loved strawberries. So farmers tied baskets of strawberries to their cows' horns as an offering to the elves.
  • California produces about 80 percent of the strawberries in the United States. Strawberries have been grown in California since the early 1900s.
  • Americans eat an average of three and one-half pounds of fresh strawberries per year. In one study, more than half of seven to nine-year-olds picked strawberries as their favorite fruit. They're nature's candy!

Anatomy

  • The strawberry isn't a true berry but is called an accessory fruit. Strawberries are the only fruit with seeds outside their skin, about 200 on each berry. And, to be super technical, each seed on a strawberry is considered by botanists to be its own separate fruit!
  • The strawberry plant is a perennial and can last for a few years, producing fruit each year.

How to Pick, Buy, & Eat

  • Some varieties of strawberries are easier to harvest than others. To pick a strawberry from its plant, grasp the stem just above the berry between your pointer finger and thumbnail and pull with a slight twisting motion.
  • To store fresh strawberries, place them whole and unwashed in one layer in a plastic or glass storage container and put them in the refrigerator. Wait to clean them until you are ready to eat them, as rinsing them quickens their spoiling.
  • Strawberries can be pickled! Especially when you pick them green or unripe. If your berries are overripe, make jam!
  • Strawberries can be puréed into smoothies or milkshakes and baked into tarts, pies, cakes, and tortes. Or, roast them and serve over ice cream and berries. You can also dehydrate and mix them into granola or purée raw strawberries and freeze them into yogurt pops. Dip them in chocolate or drizzle them with cream. Strawberries are incredibly versatile—the fruit we wait all year to enjoy once summer weather hits!

Nutrition

  • Strawberries are a HUGE source of vitamin C, especially when eaten raw! One cup of strawberries contains 113 percent of our daily recommended value. Vitamin C is excellent for the heart, bones, and teeth. When we cut ourselves or break a bone, vitamin C comes to the rescue to help repair our tissues. 
  • Strawberries contain natural fruit sugar, called fructose. However, fructose is better than table sugar (white sugar) because it comes packaged with other vitamins, nutrients, and fiber from the rest of the fruit. Plus, the fiber in fruit helps slow down the effects of sugar in our blood.

 

Let's learn about England!

Photo by Tomsickova Tatyana/Shutterstock.com
  • England is ruled by a Monarch, a Prime Minister, and a Parliament. Windsor Castle is the oldest royal castle in the world that is still being used by the royal family.
  • England is on the island of Great Britain, along with Wales and Scotland. It is also part of the United Kingdom, which consists of those three countries and Northern Ireland. 
  • Did you know that there's no place in the UK that is more than 70 miles from the sea?! 
  • Stonehenge is a construction of immense stones that the early inhabitants of what's now Wiltshire, England, began building around 3100 BCE. The final sections were completed around 1600 BCE. Scientists are still not sure how or why they built it. One theory for its purpose is an astronomical observatory. It is very popular with tourists.
  • Other popular tourist spots in England include the Tower of London, Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle, Westminster Abbey, Big Ben and Parliament (Palace of Westminster), the Roman Baths and the city of Bath, and the Lake District.  
  • London, the capital city, wasn't always called that. In the past, its name was Londonium.
  • England took part in the briefest war in history. They fought Zanzibar in 1896, and Zanzibar surrendered after just 38 minutes!
  • There have been several influential English authors, but perhaps the most well-known is William Shakespeare, who wrote classics such as Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, and Hamlet.
  • English computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee is credited with inventing the World Wide Web.
  • The British really like their sandwiches—they eat almost 11.5 billion a year!

What's It Like to Be a Kid in England?

  • Most schools in England require students to wear a school uniform. 
  • Sports kids play include football (soccer), cricket, rugby, tennis, netball (similar to basketball), and rounders (similar to baseball). They also play video games, watch the telly, and ride bikes or skateboards.
  • Boxing Day is a unique holiday kids celebrate in England the day after Christmas, December 26. The official public holiday is the first weekday after Christmas if Boxing Day falls on a weekend. When the English created the holiday, it was the day to share the contents of alms boxes with the poor. Today, it is mostly a day off from school and work, although some small gifts may be given out to family and employees, or collected to give to the poor.
  • English kids may have different names for everyday items also found in the United States. For example, a kid will call his mom "mum." Their backyard is a "garden." A big truck is called a "lorry," and the trunk of a car is a "boot." Biscuits in the US are closest to the British "scones," and cookies in England are "biscuits." A TV is usually called a "telly." Bags of chips are referred to as bags of "crisps." French fries, like those from a fast-food hamburger place, might be called "fries," but if they are thicker, like the ones typically served with batter-fried fish, they're called "chips" (fish and chips). Finally, kids call the fish sticks they might have for lunch "fish fingers.

That's Berry Funny

What do you call strawberries playing the guitar? 

A jam session!

THYME for a Laugh

How does a cat make whipped cream?

With its WHISKers!

The Yolk's On You

What do you call a sad strawberry? 

A blueberry.

The Yolk's On You

What is a scarecrow’s favorite fruit? 

Straw-berries!

THYME for a Laugh

Why were the little strawberries upset? 

Because their parents were in a jam!

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