Kid-friendly Warm Ginger Milk Tea Recipe - Sticky Fingers Cooking
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Recipe: Warm Ginger Milk Tea

Recipe: Warm Ginger Milk Tea

Warm Ginger Milk Tea

by Erin Fletter
Photo by Lazartivan/Shutterstock.com
prep time
5 minutes
cook time
1 minutes
makes
1-2 servings

Fun-Da-Mentals Kitchen Skills

  • microwave :

    to heat or cook food or liquid quickly in a microwave oven, which uses high-frequency electromagnetic waves to generate heat in the food's water molecules.

  • sip :

    to drink small mouthfuls of a liquid, sometimes to taste whether it is too hot or needs more ingredients, like additional sweetener.

  • steep :

    to soak a food, like tea, in water or other liquid so as to bring out its flavor.

Equipment Checklist

  • Microwave
  • Microwave-safe mug
  • Potholder
  • Liquid measuring cup
  • Measuring spoons
  • Metal spoon
scale
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Ingredients

Warm Ginger Milk Tea

  • 3/4 C whole milk **(for DAIRY ALLERGY sub dairy-free/nut-free milk)**
  • 1 T honey
  • 1 big pinch pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 pinch dried ginger
  • 1 decaf tea bag (any flavor)

Food Allergen Substitutions

Warm Ginger Milk Tea

  • Dairy: Substitute dairy-free/nut-free milk.

Instructions

Warm Ginger Milk Tea

1.
measure + add + stir

Measure and add 3/4 cup milk, 1 tablespoon honey, 1 big pinch of pumpkin pie spice, and 1 big pinch of ground ginger to a microwavable mug. Stir to mix it all together!

2.
microwave + steep + sip

Microwave for 45 seconds to 1 minute, or until milk is hot but not boiling. Steep 1 decaf tea bag in the hot milk for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove the tea bag, stir again, and sip!

Surprise Ingredient: Ginger!

back to recipe
Photo by kostrez/Shutterstock.com

Hi!  I’m Ginger!

"My name is Ginger, and I'm happy to make your acquaintance! You may have tasted me in lots of sweet foods and drinks, like gingerbread, ginger snap cookies, pumpkin pie, and ginger ale. But, I also add my unique flavor to savory dishes, like stir-fries and potstickers! If you use my fresh rhizome or root in a recipe, delicately peel my beige, papery skin (the back of a metal spoon works great!) and grate my juicy flesh into the food! I also come in a dried and ground form and as crystallized ginger. As a bonus, I might even make your tummy ache feel better!"

History

  • Ginger is a native plant of India and China and is a common cooking spice used throughout the world.
  • Ginger is one of the oldest plants used for medicine. 
  • Which spices do you think are most commonly found on kitchen tables around the world? If you said salt and pepper, you'd be right! It truly depends on where you are in the world. In the ninth century, Europeans placed powdered ginger on the table alongside salt and pepper.
  • A long, long time ago, ginger was used to preserve food and keep it from getting rotten.
  • Greeks used to eat ginger wrapped in bread to treat digestive problems. After a while, they added ginger to bread dough to create the first recipe for gingerbread! 
  • Ginger grows in many tropical countries, including the Caribbean islands. However, ginger from Jamaica is considered by many to be the best! Do you know where your ginger originated?
  • Ginger is also grown in Florida, Hawaii, and along the eastern coast of Texas.

Anatomy & Etymology

  • Related to cardamom and turmeric, the ginger plant is part of the Zingiberaceae or Ginger family. We use the "rhizome" part of the plant, which are underground stems. Sometimes we can eat the rhizome part of a plant, and sometimes we can't! For example, bamboo plants are rooted underground by rhizomes, but the rhizome is not the part of the plant we eat—instead, we eat the bamboo shoots that come up out of the ground. But we do eat the rhizomes of plants such as ginger, turmeric, and arrowroot! 
  • Rhizomes are also the storage compartment of the plant. What do rhizomes store? Starches, proteins, and other nutrients—that's why we eat this part of the plant (because it's nutritious!).
  • Ginger Root is characterized by its aroma: it smells strong, sweet, and woodsy. Its skin is not something we eat—we peel the skin to reveal ginger's coarse, stringy, aromatic flesh.
  • The ginger plant looks like a reed and has been used in the kitchen and as medicine for the past 5,000 years. A ginger plant can reach three to four feet tall.
  • The word "ginger" comes from late Old English "gingifer," from medieval Latin "gingiber," from Greek "zingiberis," and from Pali, a Middle Indo-Aryan language "siṅgivera."

How to Pick, Buy, & Eat

  • Fresh ginger is available year-round, where you can find it in the grocery store produce section.
  • When selecting fresh ginger, choose robust, firm roots that feel heavy, and have a spicy fragrance and smooth skin. 
  • Ginger root length is a sign of age, and mature rhizomes will be spicier and more fibrous than younger roots.
  • Ginger should not be cracked or withered—these are signs of aged ginger past its prime. 
  • To store ginger root, wrap it in a paper towel or plastic wrap or put it in a plastic bag before placing it in the refrigerator for two to three weeks. You can also freeze it for up to three months. 
  • According to many chefs and cooks, fresh ginger is best and can be added to sauces, soups, and stews. Dried and powdered ginger has a more spicy, intense flavor and is often used in baked desserts like gingerbread, gingersnaps, and ginger cake.
  • Ginger can be sliced, minced, grated, or left whole to steep in recipes (minced ginger has the most intense flavor). It can also be dried, pickled, crystallized, candied, or preserved.
  • Ginger tastes sweet, spicy, and pungent and increases flavor in a range of dishes, from stir-fried beef or tofu to ginger tea. 

Nutrition

  • Ginger continues to be used to treat nausea and to prevent seasickness.
  • Ginger may also have anti-inflammatory properties and increase digestive function.
  • Despite its natural properties, any medicinal use of ginger should be discussed with a doctor. Limiting the amount you take will help avoid heartburn. It may also interfere with anticoagulant medicine.

 

Types of Milk Tea!

Photo by gowithstock/Shutterstock.com (Taiwan Bubble Tea)
  • Many countries have a version of milk tea that is part of their culture. Milk Tea is simply tea with milk, although preparation methods may vary, and it may be served hot or cold and include sweeteners and various spices. 
  • In India and throughout South Asia, "masala chai" or "spicy tea" is popular. It is made by brewing black tea leaves in milk and water, then adding sugar and spices.
  • "Suutei tsai," also known as "Mongolian salty tea," is a milk tea from Mongolia made with tea leaves, milk, water, and salt.   
  • Taiwan has "bubble tea," which found its way via Taiwanese immigrants to the United States in the 1990s. It is also called "pearl milk tea" and "boba tea." Bubble tea is sometimes milk-free; however, condensed or other milk and sugar are typically added to black, green, or oolong tea. It is often served cold, and toppings, like "boba" (tapioca pearls), are added. 
  • In the United Kingdom, it is common to have milk in a black tea like English breakfast tea. Some Brits add milk to the cup before the tea, and some add it after. There seems to be some debate about the method that results in the best cup of tea or "cuppa."

Let's Learn About India!

Photo by Charu Chaturvedi on Unsplash
  • India is a country in South Asia and is officially called the Republic of India. It is the second-most populous country in the world and has the largest population of any democratic nation. 
  • Hindi and English are official languages, and there are 447 native languages spoken in India.
  • India's government includes a president, prime minister, and parliament. Twenty-eight states and eight union territories make up India's federal union. 
  • India's currency is the Indian "rupee." It is illegal for foreigners to take rupees out of India.
  • Emperor Shah Jahan commissioned the Taj Mahal's construction in 1632 for his wife, Mumtaz Mahal.
  • The anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi's birthday is celebrated on October 2. He is considered India's "Father of the Nation" and led the Indian people to independence from 89 years of British rule in 1947. Gandhi's peaceful protest movement inspired many people in other countries.
  • India's national symbols are the lotus flower, the Bengal tiger, and the peacock.
  • Some of the world's highest mountains are in India, including Kanchenjunga, the third tallest at 28,169 feet. 
  • The Bay of Bengal is a huge bay bordering the southeastern part of India and is home to the world's largest mangrove forest. Here, tigers swim in the same waters as dolphins, sea turtles, sharks, and saltwater crocodiles. 
  • The snow leopard, the Indian rhinoceros, the Bengal tiger, and the Asian elephant are all animals of India. Globally, it is the only country that has both lions and tigers.
  • The most popular sport in India is cricket!
  • It is hot in India, so people there often wear loose clothes. Traditional clothing differs by area in India. Women may wear saris, long pieces of colorful cotton or silk draped over and around the body like a dress. Men may wear a dhoti, made of material wrapped around the hips and pulled through the legs, somewhat resembling loose pants, although they aren't seen in cities much anymore. Photos of Gandhi show him wearing dhotis.
  • Seventy percent of the world's spices come from India.
  • Staple foods in India include lentils, rice, bread, and spices. People living on the coast eat more fish and seafood. In other regions, they eat chicken, beef, and game meats. Many people throughout India are vegetarians. Common fruits and vegetables are mangoes, apples, oranges, pineapples, bananas, onions, okra, potatoes, spinach, and carrots.  
  • Curries are popular dishes in India and are made with a variety of vegetables, fish, meat, and fruits, and spices. 
  • When people greet each other in India, as a sign of respect, they bow, placing their hands together before their chest or face, and say "Namaste," which translates to "I bow to the divine in you."

What's It Like to Be a Kid in India?

  • Indian parents are encouraged to start their kids in preschool at 2½ to 3 years old. School is usually taught in a particular state's language, which could be Hindi, English, or another language. 
  • Kids often have their grandparents living with them in the family household.
  • Along with cricket, tennis, badminton, and chess, kids may play traditional Indian games like kabaddi or kho-kho, both played by teams, or kancha, a marble game played individually or with others.
  • Kids enjoy the Holi festival, which is a religious celebration that also heralds the arrival of spring. Celebrated in various ways throughout the country, most versions include the joyous spraying and throwing of colorful powders by festival participants at one another. 

THYME for a Laugh

What is the Alphabet’s favorite drink? 

T, of course!

The Yolk's On You

What do teapots wear to a tea party? 

T-shirts!

Lettuce Joke Around

Why does a milking stool have only three legs?

Because the cow has the udder!

That's Berry Funny

What do you call a cow that doesn’t give milk?

A milk dud!

That's Berry Funny

What is the noisiest spice? 

Ginger Snap!

Lettuce Joke Around

Where do Sticky Fingers Cooking chefs live? 

In gingerbread houses, of course!

The Yolk's On You

Why must you be careful of tea at night? 

Because it might mug you.

Lettuce Joke Around

A skeleton walks into a restaurant and says…  

"Waiter, I'll have a ginger ale and a mop."

The Yolk's On You

What did mama cow say to baby calf?

It’s pasture bedtime.

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