Kid-friendly Warm Honey Bear Tea Recipe - Sticky Fingers Cooking
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Recipe: Warm Honey Bear Tea

Recipe: Warm Honey Bear Tea

Warm Honey Bear Tea

by Dylan Sabuco
Photo by Kerdkanno/Shutterstock.com
prep time
5 minutes
cook time
5 minutes
makes
4-6 servings

Fun Food Story

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Warm Honey Bear Tea

This sweet, simple concoction consists of mint stems simmered and steeped in honeyed water. Serve hot or iced!

Happy & Healthy Cooking,

Chef Erin, Food-Geek-in-Chief

Fun-Da-Mentals Kitchen Skills

  • measure :

    to calculate the specific amount of an ingredient required using a measuring tool (like measuring cups or spoons).

  • simmer :

    to cook a food gently, usually in a liquid, until softened.

Equipment Checklist

  • Large saucepan
  • Liquid measuring cup
  • Wooden spoon
  • Pitcher
scale
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Ingredients

Warm Honey Bear Tea

  • 1/2 C honey
  • 3 1/2 C water
  • 3 whole stems of mint (not the leaves—you can use the leaves in Couscous and White Bean Confetti Tabouli or another recipe)

Instructions

Warm Honey Bear Tea

1.
measure + simmer

Measure and combine 1/2 cup honey and 3 1/2 cups water over medium high heat in a large saucepan. Stir until the honey is completely dissolved, then bring the mixture to a simmer for 5 minutes.

2.
stir + cool

Remove the leaves from 3 mint stems (reserve leaves for Couscous and White Bean Confetti Tabouli or another recipe). Then, stir the stems into the honey and water mixture. Turn the heat off and let the tea cool for a few minutes before you serve it. You can also transfer the tea to a pitcher and chill it in your refrigerator for Iced Honey Bear Tea. Enjoy!

Surprise Ingredient: Honey!

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Photo by Jag_cz/Shutterstock.com

Hi! I'm Honey!

"I'm a golden, thick, naturally sweet liquid made by honeybees! My flavor varies depending on the particular flower nectar that bees carry home to their hive. Did you know I can last indefinitely? That's forever! Try squeezing or dribbling me into tea, on biscuits, toast, or fruit, and add me to desserts."   

  • Honeybees make honey—they are one of the world's insects that makes food people can eat. An average bee makes about one-twelfth of a teaspoon of honey during its whole life.
  • In Spain, an 8,000-year-old cave painting in the Cuevas de la Araña (Spider Caves) depicts a person gathering honey from a beehive. 
  • Egyptian hieroglyphs record the practice of beekeeping in ancient Egypt and honey's use as a sweetener and as a soothing ointment for wounds. Egyptians also buried their dead with honey or used it in mummification.
  • Ancient Greece had its beekeepers, and references to honey also appear in ancient Indian and Israelite texts.
  • Honey has an indefinite shelf life—it can last forever if well stored because it has natural preservatives. It may crystallize eventually, but the crystals will melt if you warm it by putting the jar in a bowl or pot of hot water or in the microwave on low power. 
  • People initially used honey as a culinary sweetener but now recognize it as a healing ingredient in medicinal treatment. For example, honey can help soothe a cough or sore throat and heal burns or cuts on your skin. 
  • Eating local honey, made from bees living in the same area where you live, may help you build up a resistance to pollen, thereby reducing your allergies. However, there is not sufficient evidence for this. 
  • Infants do not yet have any resistance to the bacteria in honey, so keep it out of their diet until they are over one year old. 
  • Honey consists primarily of fructose and other natural sugars and has insignificant amounts of vitamins and minerals, so it is wise to limit your honey intake as you do with other sugars. 
  • Honey soaks up moisture rapidly. To make cake and cookies last longer and retain their moistness, substitute half of the sugar in a recipe with honey.

Let's Learn About the Middle East!

Photo by Shutterstock
  • The Middle Eastern region sits in Western Asia and includes the following countries: Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. 
  • Several bodies of water border some of the countries, including the Mediterranean Sea, the Arabian Sea, the Caspian Sea, the Black Sea, and the Red Sea. 
  • People have lived in the Middle East for thousands of years, and they may speak one of the six major languages: Arabic, Greek, Hebrew, Kurdish, Persian, or Turkish. In addition, there are about 20 minority languages in the region. It is common for Middle Eastern people to speak more than one language.
  • The total area is 2,782,860 square miles, and the population is over 371 million. Saudi Arabia is the biggest in size, but Egypt has the most people.
  • The climate is hot and dry, with little available water beyond several rivers, like the Nile and its delta and the watersheds of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. 
  • Family is very important to the people of the Middle East. Food culture is rich and varied, with many recipes and methods overlapping. 
  • Middle Eastern art forms are stunning. Think handmade carpets, henna, marbling, glazed tile works, pottery, motifs, and embroidery. 
  • A typical meal in the Middle East is meat, fish, or stew, and various vegetable dishes or salads. Meals are served with bread or rice and often start with a salad, appetizers, dip-like spreads such as hummus or baba ganoush, pickles, and bowls of olives, dates, and nuts. Middle Eastern meals are feasts!

Lettuce Joke Around

Why do bees have sticky hair?

Because they use a honeycomb!

Lettuce Joke Around

What is a mint’s favorite sport? 

Bad-mint-on!

Lettuce Joke Around

What do teapots wear to a tea party? 

T-shirts!

THYME for a Laugh

What seasoning is spicy yet cold?

Pepper-mint!

That's Berry Funny

What is the Alphabet’s favorite drink? 

T, of course!

THYME for a Laugh

Why did the honeybee go to the barbershop? 

To get a buzz-cut!

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